Know Your Numbers: Hemoglobin A1c

Know Your Numbers:

Hemoglobin A1c

 

So most diabetics are very familiar with this number, but for those that aren’t I want to touch on hemoglobin A1c and why it’s important.

According the wikipedia:  is a form of hemoglobin that is measured primarily to identify the average plasmaglucoseconcentration over prolonged periods of time. It is formed in a non-enzymatic glycation pathway by hemoglobin’s exposure to plasma glucose. Normal levels of glucose produce a normal amount of glycated hemoglobin. As the average amount of plasma glucose increases, the fraction of glycated hemoglobin increases in a predictable way. This serves as a marker for average blood glucose levels over the previous months prior to the measurement.

Doctors use your hemoglobin A1c to figure out your glucose control of a 2-3 month span. Typically we expect it to be < 7% as a sign that your diabetes is under control. But new data shows that this may be too controlled and that each patient should be individualized.

The approximate mapping between HbA1c values given in DCCT percentage (%) and eAG (estimated average glucose) measurements is given by the following equation and the table is seen before:

eAG(mg/dl) = 28.7 × A1C − 46.7
eAG(mmol/l) = 1.59 × A1C − 2.59
Data in parentheses are 95% confidence intervals
HbA1c eAG (estimated average glucose)
(%) (mmol/mol)[23] (mmol/L) (mg/dL)
5 31 5.4 (4.2–6.7) 97 (76–120)
6 42 7.0 (5.5–8.5) 126 (100–152)
7 53 8.6 (6.8–10.3) 154 (123–185)
8 64 10.2 (8.1–12.1) 183 (147–217)
9 75 11.8 (9.4–13.9) 212 (170–249)
10 86 13.4 (10.7–15.7) 240 (193–282)
11 97 14.9 (12.0–17.5) 269 (217–314)
12 108 16.5 (13.3–19.3) 298 (240–347)
13 119 18.1 (15-21) 326 (260-380)
14 130 19.7 (16-23) 355 (290-410)
15 140 21.3 (17-25) 384 (310-440)
16 151 22.9 (19-26) 413 (330-480)
17 162 24.5 (20-28) 441 (460-510)
18 173 26.1 (21-30) 470 (380-540)
19 184 27.7 (23-32) 499 (410-570)

Also according to the ADA’s latest executive summary of management of diabetes hemoglobin A1c can now be used to diagnose if it is > 6.5%.

 

4 thoughts on “Know Your Numbers: Hemoglobin A1c

  1. I am extremely inspired together with your writing abilities and also with the layout to your blog. Is that this a paid subject or did you customize it your self? Anyway keep up the nice high quality writing, it is rare to look a great weblog like this one today..

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *